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How to get rid of Memory Management Stop Code BSOD?

By Emmanuel Seriki | February 4, 2020 |

greater than 19 minutes

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Windows 10, like previous Windows versions, is programmed to display error messages to inform users of issues in the operating system environment. Blue screen of death (BSOD) errors constitute a special class of errors associated with crashes that force computers to shut down.

In other words, if a PC went down with a blue screen, then it did so because it could no longer operate safely. Most blue screen of death errors come with a STOP code that helps users identify or troubleshoot the issues. However, other times, when no specific STOP code (in numbers and letters) appears with the BSOD, you have to work out the other details on the notification screen.

In this guide, we intend to examine the Memory Management blue screen of death error. The STOP code value for this particular blue screen of death reads MEMORY MANAGEMENT. In fact, since you are here, you probably saw a message in this form:

Your PC ran into a problem and needs to restart. We’re just collecting some error info, and then we’ll restart for you.

XX% complete.

For more information about this issue and possible fixes, visit InsertURLHere

If you call a support person, give them this info:

Stop Code: MEMORY MANAGEMENT.

What is the Memory Management STOP code BSOD?

Memory Management is a function or setup that plays a vital role in the smooth running of your system. It controls and manages your computer memory; it works to assign blocks to various applications or processes; it also handles optimizations to boost your system performance (overall).

Since Memory Management is an integral function or setup in Windows, issues affecting it often manifest themselves into serious problems, such as the ones defined by blue screen of death errors. Yes, the appearance of the Memory Management BSOD means something is wrong with the memory management process on your computer.

What causes the Memory Management STOP code BSOD?

The vast majority of memory management errors are down to inconsistencies in hardware code (or software), setups, or outright failures. We can summarize the most likely events or issues due to which the Memory Management blue screen of death shows up on your computer this way:

  • Driver problems
  • Corrupted or damaged system files
  • Conflicts involving hardware devices or applications
  • Disk or drive problems
  • BIOS problems

The provided list is far from exhaustive; we cannot list all the possible causes because we do not know all of them. Anyway, since you know certain things about the blue screen of death you are dealing with, it is time you moved to do some work to make things right. Well, the fixes are probably the reason you came here in the first place.

How to remove the Memory Management STOP code BSOD

Before you begin trying out complicated fixes to the problem, you will do well to restart your computer. Ideally, you should restart your PC several times and then check your system to see how it holds.

After the reboot, you must do all that’s necessary to recreate the error. If you were streaming a 4K video on a particular site or playing a 3D game, then you have to repeat the same operation. Test things for as long as necessary to verify that the BSOD error no longer comes up.

If your computer goes down with a blue screen again, then you have to try out the first solution on the list to fix things. You might have to continue to the second procedure and work your way down through the rest until the problem gets resolved and the blue screen stops appearing.

  1. Run the Windows memory diagnostic tool:

Here, we are considering the possibility that the Memory Management blue screen of death is down to issues with your machine’s RAM (Random Access Memory), which is also known as temporary memory. Microsoft provides a special utility (built into Windows) through which users get to run tests on their temporary memory. Yes, we want you to use that memory diagnostic tool to check for issues.

These are the instructions you must follow to do the job here:

  • Press (and hold down) the Windows logo button (on your PC’s keyboard) and then give the letter R key a tap to open the Run app quickly.
  • Assuming the Run window is now on your screen, you have to fill the blank text field with the following code:

mdsched.exe

  • Now, to run the code, you have to click on the OK button on the Run window (or you could give the Enter button on your keyboard a tap for the same outcome).

The Windows Memory Diagnostic window will come up now.

  • Click on the first option (Restart now and check for problems) – if you are ready to restart your machine right now.
  • Otherwise – if you do not want to restart your PC because you want to save your work or do something else – you have to go with the second option.
  • Later, you must then initiate the reboot operation on your own this way: Press the Windows button on your keyboard to access the Windows Start menu options and programs, click on the Power icon (close to the bottom-left corner of your display) to see the available options, and then choose Restart.

In any case, after the projected reboot, the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool will be brought up to run automatically. You will see the tasks being performed; you will be able to watch the progress of the operations. If the utility detects issues or errors, then you will know about them.

If you do not see any error, then there is a good chance all is well with your temporary memory. You must understand that the test involving the built-in Windows utility is far from a definitive one. If anything, it is quite basic compared to the tests that third-party test tools are capable of performing on RAMs. Therefore, you must not take the lack of errors as confirmation that your temporary memory is in a good state.

If you saw an error, then you will do well to check online for more information about it. You are likely to find a solution. Some problems affecting the temporary memory – especially regular errors – can be resolved through software operations, while there are other issues for which fixes do not exist. If you do end up with the latter, then you will probably have to replace your RAM or one of its sticks, at least.

  1. Run the CHKDSK tool:

Here, we are considering the possibility that the issues in view – which caused the Memory Management BSOD to appear – have something to do with problems affecting your hard drive. Perhaps, the NTFS volume on it has fallen to corruption. To be fair, there are numerous possibilities. Here too, we want you to use the tool Microsoft built into Windows for such purposes (testing a hard drive).

Anyway, these are the steps you must go through to use the Disk Check tool:

  • Press (and hold down) the Windows logo button (on your PC’s keyboard) and then give the letter X key a tap.

The list of applications and options that constitute the Power User menu will be displayed now.

  • Select Command Prompt admin to launch this program.
  • Assuming the Administrator: Command Prompt window has been brought up, you have to type the following code into the field there:

chkdsk /f /r

  • Give the Enter button on your machine’s keyboard a tap.

Windows will now work to execute the code. You are likely to see a message stating that Chkdsk cannot run because the volume is currently being used by another process and with an offer to reschedule the volume-checking process for later.

  • Type Y into the field and then hit the Enter button on your keyboard.

By executing Y as a code, you get to specify your preference for the rescheduling of the disk-checking operation, so Windows will initiate the test the next time your computer restarts.

  • You can close the admin Command Prompt window.
  • If you want to save or round up your work, then now is the time to do it. If you have any unfinished business on your computer, then you have to make arrangements to complete it later.
  • Now, you must restart your computer. You should be familiar with the reboot task here.

After your computer comes on again, as expected, the Disk Check tool will be brought up automatically to run the relevant checks on your hard drive. You have to be patient because the test might take a while. In any case, the tool will inform you about the issues it detected (if it finds anything at all). In that case, you will have to do further research (using the problem details) to find appropriate solutions.

If the Disk Check tool finds nothing, then your hard drive is probably fine and issues with it were unlikely to be the cause of the BSOD. Nevertheless, you are still free to carry out extensive (or even more advanced) tests to confirm the results of the findings. The Disk Check tool is hardly the best utility at detecting problems affecting a drive, after all.

  1. Update your video card driver:

We earlier established that the Memory Management blue screen of death is sometimes down to driver issues. Well, the procedure here is supposed to target the problem for this particular case (if our assumption holds true). You should know this: A driver is a program (or set of code) that defines or controls the interactions between hardware devices and software.

The video card driver is of interest to us because it is the driver most likely to be involved in blue screen crashes, never mind a BSOD involving the memory management function in Windows. The video card driver is the driver that handles operations involving the graphics card and programs (or apps). It plays a critical role in the image display and video rendering processes in Windows. It is only logical that issues involving such an important component can manifest themselves into serious problems, such as BSODs.

The video card driver might be faulty, broken, corrupted, or simply unable to function. Normally, we would recommend that you reinstall the driver to fix issues with it. The processes that make up the uninstallation and installation operations sometimes do enough to eliminate issues and inconsistencies in driver code. You can try reinstalling the driver (if you have time to spare) to see what happens.

However, this time, we strongly advise that you update your video card driver (at once). By updating the driver, you get to introduce fresh code and settings (from the new driver version), and the discrepancies or issues with the old driver will become nonfactors. Your computer is likely to stop blue screening after you install an updated driver.

First, we will walk you through the driver update process involving the update function built into Windows for the purpose in view. Follow these instructions:

  • Do a right-click on the Windows icon in the bottom-left corner of your display.

The Power User menu applications and options list will come up.

  • Click on Device Manager to open this program.
  • Assuming you are now on the Device Manager window, you have to go through the list of categories carefully.
  • Once you find Display Adapters, you have to click on the expansion icon for this category.

The devices under the Display Adapters category will become visible now.

  • Now, you must locate your main video card driver (the one for your dedicated graphics card) and then do a right-click on it to see the available options.
  • Select Update driver.

The Update Driver window for the chosen video card driver will be displayed now.

  • You have to select the first option there (Automatically search for updated driver software).

Well, the first option is the only feasible option because you need Windows to do the job for you. Your system is supposed to use your internet connection to contact the necessary servers or centers to check for updated drivers designed for your video card device.

  • If Windows finds something, then it will inform you of a new driver version being available, and then it will proceed to download the software. You will simply have to follow the on-screen instructions to install the driver – if this step applies.
  • If no new driver version for your video card is found, then Windows will tell that you are running the latest driver version, or your system will state that it found nothing. In that case, you will have to consider alternative methods of updating the video card driver.
  • After you finish installing the new driver for your video card, you have to restart your computer to finish things.
  • Reattempt the task with which you encountered the BSOD to see if the same issue manifests itself again.

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With the recommended application, your PC will eventually end up with new drivers for almost all its devices or components – and this is one excellent outcome. There is a reasonable chance the BSOD is down to issues affecting the driver for a different device, and not the video card (as we assumed). In that case, by installing updates for all drivers, you get to fix the problems affecting almost every device, which means nothing gets left out.

Well, after all the driver installation processes reach completion, you have to restart your computer. Your system needs the reboot to allow Windows to take all the changes (resulting from the introduction of new code and settings for multiple drivers) into account. Only after the reboot procedure must you try to test things to find out if the Memory Management blue screen of death error has been resolved for good.

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  1. Check all the applications you recently installed:

There is a good chance the issues triggering the blue screen of death have something to do with conflicts or incompatibilities involving certain programs on your computer. Perhaps, there is a new program causing trouble for other applications (and your system). You might have to get rid of that program for the time being for peace to reign.

You can check the list of installed programs by accessing the Programs and Features menu in Control Panel or the Apps screen in Settings. We recommend you look at the two lists.

These instructions cover everything that you need to do:

  • Use the Windows logo button + letter R keyboard shortcut to open the Run app quickly.
  • Once the small Run window appears, you have to fill the text box there with the following code:

appwiz.cpl

  • To run the code, you have to click on the OK button on the Run window (or you can hit the Enter button on your machine’s keyboard).

You will be directed to the Programs and Features menu in Control Panel now.

  • Go through the list of applications and take note of the ones you brought in recently. You have to remove them.
  • To uninstall an application, you have to click on it (to get it highlighted), do a right-click on the now highlighted app to see some options, and then choose Uninstall.

The uninstaller or uninstallation wizard window for the chosen application will be displayed now.

  • Follow the on-screen directions to uninstall the app.
  • After you finish removing one application, you have to go back to the Programs and Features screen (in Control Panel) to initiate the uninstallation process for another program.

Ideally, you should remove as many apps as you can, especially those ones you recently installed (or suspect to be causing issues).

  • After the uninstallation process for the last program reaches completion, you have to restart your computer.

We now recommend you check the Apps screen in Settings to see if there are applications you must uninstall from the platform there. Continue with these instructions:

  • Open the Settings app by pressing (and holding down) the Windows logo button and then giving the letter I key a tap.
  • Once the Settings application window comes up, you have to click on Apps (one of the options on the main menu there).

You will be directed to the Apps screen.

  • Now, you must look to the pane close to the right border of the window. Go through the applications there.
  • If you find an app that you recently installed or one you feel must be removed, then you have to click on it to get it highlighted, and then click on the Uninstall button (that became visible only recently).
  • Here, you will probably have to click on the Uninstall button again to confirm the operation you initiated.
  • Follow the on-screen directions to remove the app – if this step applies.

If there are other applications you have to uninstall, then you must go back to the Apps screen in Settings and continue your work from there.

  • Once you are done removing all the problematic or conflict-causing applications, you have to close the Settings app and then restart your computer.
  • As usual, after your computer starts up and reaches stability, you have to make the necessary checks to confirm that the Memory Management blue screen of death is no longer an issue on your PC.
  1. Try a different power configuration:

Some users reported that they had managed to resolve the Memory Management blue screen of death error by choosing a different power plan. Some people using Balanced (recommended) had to switch to High performance, while others using Power Saver had to switch to Balanced (recommended).

The ideal power configuration varies. You will have to try out or test other plans to find out which one of them is best for your computer (and stops it from going down with blue screens).

Follow these instructions:

  • Open the Run app by pressing (and holding down) the Windows logo button on your device’s keyboard and then hitting the letter R key.
  • Once the Run window appears, you have to type control into the text box there and then hit the Enter button on your keyboard to force Windows to run the code.
  • Assuming you are now on the Control Panel window, you have to click on the drop-down menu for View by to see the available options (in the top-right corner of your display).
  • Choose Large icons.

Once View by gets set to Large icons, the options on the Control Panel main screen will be rearranged based on the new configuration.

  • Click on Power Options.

You will be directed to the Choose or customize a power plan screen.

  • Take note of your current power plan (the one whose radio button is currently ticked).
  • Click on the radio button for a different power plan.

If you are using Balanced (recommended), for example, then you have to choose either High Performance or Power Saver.

  • Close the Control Panel window and then restart your computer.
  • Run some tests to confirm that the Memory Management BSOD issue has been resolved for good.

If the blue screen crashes persist, then you have to go back to the Power Options screen in Control Panel, choose a different power plan, and then test things again.

  1. Delete your computer’s temporary files and folders:

Here, we want you to use the Disk Cleanup tool to get rid of the redundant or unnecessary files and folders. When you browse the internet, for example, your computer reads and uses data from certain files and packages to assist you with some tasks and Windows ends up with some unnecessary files (after the entire operation).

Your system is programmed to get rid of those files from time to time, but Windows’ removal technique or procedure has its flaws. Those useless items tend to accumulate over time, no matter what Windows does to remove them. There is a good chance your computer’s memory management struggles – which are causing your machine to blue screen – are down to the presence of the junk or redundant files.

Well, the buildup of useless items is known to cause some systems to behave sluggishly or reduce their processing speed. It might also have something to do with applications running and responding slowly; it might also cause problems that manifest themselves into more serious issues (the BSOD we are dealing with here, for example).

Anyway, to fix the problem described in those scenarios, you have to force Windows to delete all the junk or unnecessary files. Go through these steps:

  • Press the Windows logo button on your machine’s keyboard (or click on the Windows icon in the bottom-left corner of your display).

The Windows Start menu should have come up by now.

  • Type Disk Cleanup into the text box (that shows up the moment you start to type) to perform a search task using those keywords as the query.
  • Once Disk Cleanup (App) emerges as the primary entry on the results list returned, you have to click on it to launch the needed program.
  • Once the Disk Cleanup utility window comes up, you have to use the boxes to specify the items or categories of files you want to delete.

We advise that you select all the boxes because we want you to remove all the files, but we understand that you might not be able to do this. You might want to keep certain stuff (if they are still needed).

Once you are done selecting the appropriate boxes, Windows will inform you of the space you stand to recover after you initiate the removal operation for the chosen items or categories.

The more files or stuff you can delete, the better for your chances of resolving the problem. To be fair, most items and categories on the list are expendable, so we expect you to select almost all the boxes.

  • Assuming you are now ready to proceed with the operation, you have to click on the Clean up system files button (close to the bottom of the window).
  • You might have to click on another button on a prompt to affirm things – if Windows brings up a dialog to get some form of confirmation for the temporary file removal operation.
  • In any case, you must now restart your computer. It does not matter if things went well or not.
  • Use your computer for as long as you can to confirm that the issues defined by the Memory Management BSOD no longer bother you.
  1. Increase your computer’s virtual memory manually:

We believe your computer is currently configured to determine the amount of virtual memory needed to keep things running smoothly. However, since you are dealing with a blue screen of death that stems from issues with memory management, you might benefit from making changes to the memory setup to define a new configuration.

Perhaps, your computer is experiencing stability issues because it is constantly allocating insufficient space for virtual memory. In that case, if our assumptions hold true, you will be able to make things right by specifying the virtual memory that must be used. Well, the new figure will probably be bigger than the one currently used.

Anyway, these are the instructions you must follow to adjust the virtual memory size:

  • First, you have to open the Run app by pressing (and holding) down the Windows logo button and then giving the letter R key a tap.
  • This time, after the small Run window gets brought up, you have to fill the blank text field on it with the following code:

sysdm.cpl

  • Click on the OK button on the Run window to force Windows to run the code (or you can hit the Enter button on your machine’s keyboard for the same result).

The System Properties window will come up now.

  • Click on the Advanced tab (close to the top of the window) to go there.
  • Locate the Performance section (usually the first on the window) and then click on the Settings button beside it.

The Performance Options window will come up now.

  • On the new window too, you have to click on the Advanced tab to go there.
  • Now, you must locate the Virtual memory section and then click on the Change button beside it.

The Virtual Memory window will be brought up now.

  • Click on the checkbox for Automatically manage paging file size for all drives to deselect this parameter.

Well, you have to do away with that setting since you want Windows to stop making decisions on the memory size automatically.

  • Under the Drive [Volume Label], you have to click on your system drive (C:) to get it highlighted there.
  • Now, you have to click on the radio button for Custom size (to get this parameter selected).
  • Now, you must fill the field for size with the figure you want.

You might want to check the internet for ideas on what the virtual memory size should be (depending on your computer, its capabilities, and other relevant factors). You are likely to find recommendations from Microsoft and other users, so you have to process the information and make the right decision.

  • Here, assuming you are done filling the box, you have to click on the OK button to save the configuration for your computer memory.
  • Test things to confirm that the BSOD can no longer be triggered (no matter what you do).

If your computer goes down with a blue screen of death crash again, then you have to restart your PC and then try to recreate the scenario or event where the problem is supposed to manifest itself again to see what happens.

Other things you can try to resolve Memory Management blue screen of death errors on a Windows 10 PC

We know you came here to learn how to remove the Memory Management BSOD error using well-described solutions. However, if your machine continues to blue screen the same way as before, then you have to apply less popular fixes (in fewer details) that other users used to resolve the problem in their case. Here are some of them:

  1. Run a deep or full scan for viruses and malware on your computer:

Here, you must consider the possibility that your PC is struggling with BSODs due to the activity of malicious programs. If nothing worked up to this point, then you must take your chances with everything. You will do well to get a good security program (antivirus or antimalware application) and instruct it to scan all the files and folders on your computer’s disk. You will then have to remove the threats (if they get detected) and restart your computer to finish things.

  1. Download and install all the available Windows updates:

Sometimes a procedure as simple or basic as the downloading and installation of Windows updates turns out to be the ideal solution to a serious problem. If the manifestations of the Memory Management BSOD that you are struggling with have anything to do with your Windows build lacking certain code or packages (in a specific update), then your problems are likely to disappear after you install all the updates released for your PC.

  1. Run scans using the SFC and DISM tools on an elevated Command Prompt to fix issues.

  1. Test all your computer hardware parts for faults or damage.

  1. Restore your old PC settings – if you made changes to its configuration to overclock it, for example.

  1. Check for programs causing memory leaks (through the Task Manager application).

  1. Use System Restore to make things right.

  1. Reset/repair Windows.

  1. Clean install Windows.

  1. Replace your system drive – if you ever find out that your disk shortcomings or faults have something to do with the BSOD.

Fed up with your slow PC? Tired of waiting for Windows to start up? Take a look at the most common reasons behind poor performance and the best ways to deal with them here.

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